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FIHRM-ASIA PACIFIC EVENTS

Members' Events
2021-12-30

Ayo! Ayo! Tomorrow Must Be Better Oct. 6th, 2021 - Mar. 27th, 2022 Renai Building, Jingmei White Terror Memorial Park    In 2019, at the ICOM General Conference in Kyoto, the Federation of International Human Rights Museums officially announced the launch of its Asia-Pacific branch (FIHRM-AP), headquartered at Taiwan’s National Human Rights Museum. We build an education platform for our colleagues in the Asia-Pacific region, mainly to share more knowledge on the concept of empowerment, engagement, partnership, and collaboration. In response to the theme for International Museum Day 2020, “Museums for Equality: Diversity and Inclusion,” FIHRM-AP invited 14 museums and 15 NGOs in Taiwan and formed the 2020 Co-Learning Group on Migration and Human Rights.   In this exhibition, the National Human Rights Museum and 15 non-governmental organizations (NGOs) further transformed the discussion of "human rights and migration" into a joint curation. We looked into the fact that more than 700,000 migrant workers have become an indispensable labor force of Taiwan, the corresponding basic human rights issues such as religion, language, culture, daily life, and working conditions, however, have not been adequately secured with times.   This exhibition leads the audience to measure the distance between migrant workers and Taiwanese people’s daily lives. Migrant workers, Taiwanese people, and NGOs, there are three kinds of "sense of daily life" that interlinked and formed each other. We try to guide the audience to examine the various difficulties behind the legal system of migrant workers on the surface of "seemingly ordinary daily life." After introducing the objects and services migrant workers produce through product catalogs; we take the audience into the working environment to physically experience their working conditions. Furthermore, through the testimony and exhibits of the migrant workers, the audience can learn about the real needs and expectations of their life in Taiwan. This exhibition finally brings out how NGOs have been working for the human rights of migrant workers/ new residents by presenting the important events of the past 30 years of migrant workers in the memorabilia.   We hope that this special exhibition can act a public platform. We look forward to inviting the audience to notice the existence of migrant workers in their daily life, reflect on policies and systematic problems, and finally take action. Organized by: The National Human Rights Museum, FIHRM-AP   Co-organized by: 1095 Studio The Awakening Foundation Brilliant Time Bookstore The Garden of Hope Foundation Khuôn viên văn hoá Việt Nam National Domestic Workers’ Union Serve the People Association Stella Maris Center, Kaohsiung Taipei Womens’ Rescue Foundation Taiwan Association for Human Rights Taiwan International Workers’ Association (TIWA) Taiwan International Families’ Association (TIFA) Trans Asia Sisters Association, Taiwan Vietnamese Migrant Workers and Immigrants Office of the Catholic Church's Hsinchu Diocese Yilan Migrant Fishermen Union

2021-11-24

The Historical Scenarios of the White Terror in Taiwan: The Exhibition on Jing-Mei White Terror Memorial Park   Jul. 26th, 2021- Dec. 31st, 2021 Venue: National Human Rights Museum- Jing-Mei White Terror Memorial Park (131, Fuxing Rd., Xindian, New Taipei City, Taiwan)     The National Human Rights Museum is the first human rights museum in Asia to be located at the site of injustice. Since its establishment in 2018, it has taken "human rights" as its core value to restore and represent the space. Building it into a room for continuous dialogue and reflection is also an essential task of the National Human Rights Museum to promote transformational justice.   The thematic exhibition of Jing-Mei White Terror Memorial Park is knowledgeable and promotes the public's understanding of the authoritarian regime and allows mutually conflicting opinions obtained in the exhibition hall, providing an opportunity for communication.   The exhibition provides visitors with a structured and contextual introduction of the complex history of the White Terror era that is based on the viewpoint of human rights. It also tries to guide the audience to reflect on the connection with contemporary times after understanding the human rights violations of authoritarian rule.

2021-10-04

Memories for Justice: Dialogue with Museums and Archives from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cambodia, and Ireland   This seminar is part of the Deep South Museum and Archives Initiative on documentation, museums and archive work. Its objective is to introduce the concept of memories and justice while also facilitating dialogue among museum and archive professionals. This is a two-hour seminar in which each museum has approximately 20-25 minutes to speak, followed by a discussion allowing participants to ask questions and exchange ideas. Each museum will give a presentation on 1) the history of the museum and why it was founded, the museum's vision and mission, how they started, their initial challenges and how they overcame them. 2) main activities and programs, particularly the mission on memories for justice and reconciliation 3) current challenges and strategies for overcoming them, and 4) what is the museum's current and future roles? The seminar will be held in English with simultaneous Thai-English interpretation. This is not an academic seminar, but rather a platform where the speakers and audience can ask questions and engage in discussions.   Speakers: 1. Adrian Kerr, Curator, Museum of Free Derry, Ireland 2. Jasminko Halilovic, Founder and Director, War Childhood Museum, Bosnia and Herzegovina 3. Youk Chhang, Director, Documentation Center of Cambodia   Moderator: Assoc. Prof. Dr. Sudarat Muskikawong   Date & Time: 16.00-18.00 Hrs. 6 October 2021   Join via ZOOM meeting: Meeting ID: 875 2619 9524 Passcode: 868707   Organized by: The Deep South Museum and Archives’ Initiative October 6 Museum Project Peace Resource Collaborative Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University Faculty of Archaeology, Silpakorn University   Supported by: Sasakawa Peace Foundation    

2021-05-14

Through the Reflection of Green Island Date: May 17th 2021- Sept 15th 2021, 09:00-17:00 Venue: Green Island White Terror Memorial Park   The White Terror is Taiwan’s collective trauma, during which countless political prisoners were unexpectedly taken away from home and suddenly found themselves facing seemingly unending imprisonment. Since the Japanese colonial period, Green Island had been used for sheltering the so-called “furosha” (vagrants), and from that period on, the island was viewed as a place for exile. It later became the prison for keeping political prisoners during the Kuomintang regime and witnessed the violent austerity and unbearable sorrow in the era of the White Terror.   Nonetheless, this small island off the coast of Taitung where the Black Current passes, possesses its very own distinctive beauty—the intoxicating seascape, pristine coral beaches, abundant plant ecology, mysterious indigenous legacies, etc. However, even though the harsh past might appear to be buried, Green Island today faces more and new impacts, just like many other places in the world: land development and the flourishing tourism industry, while economically benefiting the island, lead to various collisions. As population migration in this era of globalization introduces fresh cultural encounters, the tangible prison built in the White Terror era is implicitly transformed into a rather intangible form of imprisonment.   This exhibition is curated based on two themes – “imprisonment” and “diaspora” to compare varying life circumstances in different times. Featuring diverse types of artists, including descendants of political prisoners, new resident filmmakers, theater workers, video and visual artists, literary writers, sound artists, etc., the exhibition presents participatory art, non-fictional creation, island architecture, archaeology, performance art and long-period artist residency, through which the imprisonment and memories of the White Terror era are transformed into a mirror that reflects our modern-day experiences.   Through the Reflection of Green Island  

2021-05-14

Cinema and Censorship in Authoritarian Taiwan Apr. 7th 2021 – Dec. 12th 2021  Tuesday- Sunday      09:00-17:00   Freedom of expression is a fundamental human right, but it is a hard-won right. In the past, films had to be censored before they were screened in cinemas in Taiwan.   Some subject matters were banned from viewership, forbid to be produced, and kept from people's minds. Many foreign movies were screened with scenes pixelated, blacked out or adapted. In the last instance their dialogues and plots were directly cut or manipulated.   The exhibition revisits the omnipresent film censorship system and questions: what exactly is the censorship system which suppressed our freedom of expression? What films were banned by the authoritarian regime? How did Taiwanese people cope with the life under censorship? How did we manage to step by step claim back freedom of expression?   The exhibition invites you to explore the nature and boundaries of freedom of expression through the lens of cinema and sharpen your sensitivity to detect "censorship moments," by unlocking visions and minds which were once shackled by the censorship system.

2021-01-15

2020 Human Rights Festival   Between International Children’s Rights Day on November 20th and the "Human Rights Day" on December 10th, the National Human Rights Museum held the 2020 Human Rights Festival. With more comprehensive and diverse art performances, including dance, music, dramas, poems, lectures, videos, parent-child activities, and related activities, NHRM tried to engage human rights, art, and life with the general public. Presenting the core values of contemporary human rights to the audience, encouraging diverse participation in human rights issues, NHRM hoped to promote cross-generation, cross-field exchange, and communication.   The curator stated that the title of 2020 Human Rights Festival:  From Frost to Qingming was to commemorate the moment of Frost 70 years ago, November 29th, 1950. It was the end of the autumn, which was the first batch of National Taiwan University and Normal University students were executed.   The performance venue of From Frost to Qingming was not only in the Jingmei White Terror Memorial Park but also in the Shuiyuan Campus of National Taiwan University, one of the historic sights, where history happened is overlaid in the life of today.2020 Human Rights Festival

News
2022-01-14

Introduction:  To facilitate better understanding of Southeast Asian migrant workers among senior school teachers and young people, 1095 Culture Studio worked with as textbook publisher in 2018 and launched Migrant Worker Life, officially introducing this board game/ teaching aid to the social studies scene of senior/ vocational high schools across Taiwan. In 2019, the effort was expanded to reach wider society, covering different age groups. 1095 Culture Studio's past experiences showed that it has been quite difficult for young people in Taiwan to connect with policy advocacy efforts and the studio's direct services to migrant workers. Instead, a soft approach like cultural promotional activity drew more active participation. Thus, combining their migrant worker support experience and innovative thinking, the studio designed a topic-oriented teaching aid with "easy to understand", "easy to engage", and "easy to promote" as their core approach. So, did it work after relevant lesson plans and teaching materials were implemented in real life educational setting? What is the next step if the studio wants to further enhance how students find connection with this issue and encourage actual expression and practice through actions? In this talk, our speaker will address the aforementioned questions and we look forward to your feedback.    Speaker: Annie Kuan  Head of 1095 Culture Studio Annie Kuan graduated from National Chung Hsing University with a Bachelor of History. She also works as a Chinese language teacher for migrant workers. She spends 30% of her time chatting with migrant workers, giving lectures and dealing with emergencies, 50% teaching at different schools and 20% researching or interviewing migrant workers about almost anything. 

2022-01-14

Date: Oct. 21st, 2021 Day2: The Network of Museums for Migrants and Social Justice Session 2: The Shelter, Caring and Support Systems for Migrants Transnational migrants are often highly vulnerable to slavery, exploitation, violence, and persecution and sustain physical or mental traumas no matter their migration is the result of forced relocation caused by racial, tribal, or religious conflicts such as asylum seekers or voluntary diaspora like migrant workers. In addition to providing shelter and care, how do human rights organizations support transnational migrants to seek justice and comfort and rebuild their future byways like documenting and archiving human rights violations and support systems like wellness (art therapy) workshops?   Moderator: Shu-Han, Lin, Refugee Project Specialist, Taiwan Association for Human Rights Speakers: (1)  Mofidul Hoque, Liberation War Museum, Bangladesh (2)  Kaili LEE, Director, GOH-Migrants, Garden of Hope Foundation, Taiwan (3)  Hsiu-Lien Chen, Researcher, Taiwan International Workers Association, Taiwan  

2022-01-14

Date: Oct. 21st, 2021 Day2: The Network of Museums for Migrants and Social Justice Session 1: Truth, Memories and Justice: How to Preserve Memories by Documenting Human Rights Violations through Oral Testimonies, Forensic Anthropology and Archiving From the moment a transnational migrant departs to the time he/ she reaches the destination country, the enormous difficulties and challenges of the journey are little known to outsiders. They easily fall prey to labor and sexual exploitation and violence while having trouble being accepted as equals by their destination society. How do human rights organization workers present truths and preserve memories through ways like oral testimonies, forensic anthropology, and archiving to realize social justice and bring about reforms?   Moderator: Braden Paynter, ICSC Speakers: (1)  Perla Torres, Family Network Director, Colibri Center for Human Rights, Arizona, USA   (2)  Christine Alai, Co-Founder Utu Wetu Trust, Kenya (3)  Father Peter Nguyen Van Hung, Director, Vietnamese Migrant Workers and Immigrants Office of the Catholic Church, Hsinchu Diocese, Taiwan  

Current Events
2021-11-24

The Historical Scenarios of the White Terror in Taiwan: The Exhibition on Jing-Mei White Terror Memorial Park   Jul. 26th, 2021- Dec. 31st, 2021 Venue: National Human Rights Museum- Jing-Mei White Terror Memorial Park (131, Fuxing Rd., Xindian, New Taipei City, Taiwan)     The National Human Rights Museum is the first human rights museum in Asia to be located at the site of injustice. Since its establishment in 2018, it has taken "human rights" as its core value to restore and represent the space. Building it into a room for continuous dialogue and reflection is also an essential task of the National Human Rights Museum to promote transformational justice.   The thematic exhibition of Jing-Mei White Terror Memorial Park is knowledgeable and promotes the public's understanding of the authoritarian regime and allows mutually conflicting opinions obtained in the exhibition hall, providing an opportunity for communication.   The exhibition provides visitors with a structured and contextual introduction of the complex history of the White Terror era that is based on the viewpoint of human rights. It also tries to guide the audience to reflect on the connection with contemporary times after understanding the human rights violations of authoritarian rule.

2021-08-16

Jul. 29th 2021-Aug. 13th 2022 Shared Journeys History is often presented as a single narrative that unfolds on a linear path, from one event to another. These ‘grand narratives’ of history are often shaped by entrenched ideologies, victors’ perspectives, colonial legacies, patriarchal values, and contested identities.   The Shared Journeys exhibition aims to decolonize the mind and the exclusive history, by bringing to light hidden, marginalized, or lost histories, and the stories of people that have lived them. The Shared Journeys exhibition includes the work of 12 member organizations of the Asian and Pacific Sites of Conscience Network, representing seven countries.   Afghanistan The Afghanistan Human Rights and Democracy Organization, AHRDO, initiated the “Memory Boxes” project in 2011 that is to collect records of thousands of items, such as the victim’s belongings, narratives, and stories from different conflicting periods at various locations, in order to challenges the deep-seated culture of impunity, public amnesia and a policy of forgetting the past.   Participating Organizations: The Afghanistan Human Rights and Democracy Organization     Tibet In the seven decades since 1951, the rise in the number of Tibetans protesting and committing self-immolation, the religious repression and cultural genocide continues within Tibet; monitoring and surveillance of citizens’ activities is at unprecedented levels; language rights are denied; and enforced disappearances and arrests are commonplace. The Exhibits highlight hidden histories that contest the CCP’s narratives.   Participating Organizations: Tibet Museum     Taiwan In 1989, Taiwan introduced the first group of migrant workers from Southeast Asia and it has steadily grown since the passing of the Employment Services Act in 1992. Today the migrant worker population in Taiwan exceeds 710,000. Despite being an important driver of the economy, they are either invisible to the general public or simply treated as work-horses who when they are no longer fit to work, run away rather than being repatriated to resort to a life of crime or become victims of violence. Through the oral histories of four migrant workers and their life stories, this exhibit contests that popular narrative.   Participating Organizations: National Human Rights Museum     Cambodia The exhibits from Cambodia focus on survivors’ narratives from the period of history dominated by the Khmer Rouge, especially the treatment of ethnic and religious minorities, and the continuing need for memorializing the victims of violence through inter-generational dialogue   Participating Organizations: The Peace Institute of Cambodia Youth for Peace Cambodia Kdei-Karuna     Bangladesh During the Liberation war of 1971, the Pakistani Army, together with their local collaborators used sexual violence and rape as a weapon of war. The objective was cultural genocide, a change in ethno-linguistic identity through Pakistani children born to Bengali women. This exhibition showcases the stories of survivors of sexual and gender based violence that speak their truths to demystify the humiliation and public shame placed on the victim.   Participating Organizations: Liberation War Museum     Sri Lanka After 26 years of conflicts, “The Herstories Project” of Sri Lanka archived with 285 women’s stories collected between 2012 and 2013. It is a deliberate effort to narratives of war and to give voice to women in conflict. “The International Centre for Ethnic Studies” uses comics as a means of creating a space for irrevocably divided communities. This oral history project by the Institute for “Social Development” captures stories of re-migration and internal displacement of estate-sector Tamil communities. This exhibit traces the history of migration through three stories of (re)migration.   Participating Organizations: The Herstories Project The International Centre for Ethnic Studies The Institute for Social Development     Nepal The human toll of the ‘People’s War’ (1996-2006) in Nepal was profound; over 17,000 people were killed, 1,500 disappeared and an estimated 20,000 tortured. Almost eight years passed before any transitional justice mechanism was formalized when the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and Commission of Inquiry into Enforced Disappearances were legally mandated by Parliament. Both the commissions failed to address the need of the victims’ families. Both, the Network of Families of the Disappeared and Voices of Women Nepal work on transitional justice issues and believe in advocating for a victim-centered approach. Their work contests historical memories of the conflict through story-telling.    Participating Organizations: Network of Families of the Disappeared, Nepal Voices of Women Media   This exhibition serves to remind us that history is also perspective. These stories are not unique, and their impact is not just localized to a specific country. They are histories of our world.