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FIHRM-ASIA PACIFIC EVENTS

Members' Events
2021-11-24

The Historical Scenarios of the White Terror in Taiwan: The Exhibition on Jing-Mei White Terror Memorial Park   Jul. 26th, 2021- Dec. 31st, 2021 Venue: National Human Rights Museum- Jing-Mei White Terror Memorial Park (131, Fuxing Rd., Xindian, New Taipei City, Taiwan)     The National Human Rights Museum is the first human rights museum in Asia to be located at the site of injustice. Since its establishment in 2018, it has taken "human rights" as its core value to restore and represent the space. Building it into a room for continuous dialogue and reflection is also an essential task of the National Human Rights Museum to promote transformational justice.   The thematic exhibition of Jing-Mei White Terror Memorial Park is knowledgeable and promotes the public's understanding of the authoritarian regime and allows mutually conflicting opinions obtained in the exhibition hall, providing an opportunity for communication.   The exhibition provides visitors with a structured and contextual introduction of the complex history of the White Terror era that is based on the viewpoint of human rights. It also tries to guide the audience to reflect on the connection with contemporary times after understanding the human rights violations of authoritarian rule.

2021-10-04

Memories for Justice: Dialogue with Museums and Archives from Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cambodia, and Ireland   This seminar is part of the Deep South Museum and Archives Initiative on documentation, museums and archive work. Its objective is to introduce the concept of memories and justice while also facilitating dialogue among museum and archive professionals. This is a two-hour seminar in which each museum has approximately 20-25 minutes to speak, followed by a discussion allowing participants to ask questions and exchange ideas. Each museum will give a presentation on 1) the history of the museum and why it was founded, the museum's vision and mission, how they started, their initial challenges and how they overcame them. 2) main activities and programs, particularly the mission on memories for justice and reconciliation 3) current challenges and strategies for overcoming them, and 4) what is the museum's current and future roles? The seminar will be held in English with simultaneous Thai-English interpretation. This is not an academic seminar, but rather a platform where the speakers and audience can ask questions and engage in discussions.   Speakers: 1. Adrian Kerr, Curator, Museum of Free Derry, Ireland 2. Jasminko Halilovic, Founder and Director, War Childhood Museum, Bosnia and Herzegovina 3. Youk Chhang, Director, Documentation Center of Cambodia   Moderator: Assoc. Prof. Dr. Sudarat Muskikawong   Date & Time: 16.00-18.00 Hrs. 6 October 2021   Join via ZOOM meeting: Meeting ID: 875 2619 9524 Passcode: 868707   Organized by: The Deep South Museum and Archives’ Initiative October 6 Museum Project Peace Resource Collaborative Institute for Population and Social Research, Mahidol University Faculty of Archaeology, Silpakorn University   Supported by: Sasakawa Peace Foundation    

2021-05-14

Through the Reflection of Green Island Date: May 17th 2021- Sept 15th 2021, 09:00-17:00 Venue: Green Island White Terror Memorial Park   The White Terror is Taiwan’s collective trauma, during which countless political prisoners were unexpectedly taken away from home and suddenly found themselves facing seemingly unending imprisonment. Since the Japanese colonial period, Green Island had been used for sheltering the so-called “furosha” (vagrants), and from that period on, the island was viewed as a place for exile. It later became the prison for keeping political prisoners during the Kuomintang regime and witnessed the violent austerity and unbearable sorrow in the era of the White Terror.   Nonetheless, this small island off the coast of Taitung where the Black Current passes, possesses its very own distinctive beauty—the intoxicating seascape, pristine coral beaches, abundant plant ecology, mysterious indigenous legacies, etc. However, even though the harsh past might appear to be buried, Green Island today faces more and new impacts, just like many other places in the world: land development and the flourishing tourism industry, while economically benefiting the island, lead to various collisions. As population migration in this era of globalization introduces fresh cultural encounters, the tangible prison built in the White Terror era is implicitly transformed into a rather intangible form of imprisonment.   This exhibition is curated based on two themes – “imprisonment” and “diaspora” to compare varying life circumstances in different times. Featuring diverse types of artists, including descendants of political prisoners, new resident filmmakers, theater workers, video and visual artists, literary writers, sound artists, etc., the exhibition presents participatory art, non-fictional creation, island architecture, archaeology, performance art and long-period artist residency, through which the imprisonment and memories of the White Terror era are transformed into a mirror that reflects our modern-day experiences.   Through the Reflection of Green Island  

2021-05-14

Cinema and Censorship in Authoritarian Taiwan Apr. 7th 2021 – Dec. 12th 2021  Tuesday- Sunday      09:00-17:00   Freedom of expression is a fundamental human right, but it is a hard-won right. In the past, films had to be censored before they were screened in cinemas in Taiwan.   Some subject matters were banned from viewership, forbid to be produced, and kept from people's minds. Many foreign movies were screened with scenes pixelated, blacked out or adapted. In the last instance their dialogues and plots were directly cut or manipulated.   The exhibition revisits the omnipresent film censorship system and questions: what exactly is the censorship system which suppressed our freedom of expression? What films were banned by the authoritarian regime? How did Taiwanese people cope with the life under censorship? How did we manage to step by step claim back freedom of expression?   The exhibition invites you to explore the nature and boundaries of freedom of expression through the lens of cinema and sharpen your sensitivity to detect "censorship moments," by unlocking visions and minds which were once shackled by the censorship system.

2021-01-15

2020 Human Rights Festival   Between International Children’s Rights Day on November 20th and the "Human Rights Day" on December 10th, the National Human Rights Museum held the 2020 Human Rights Festival. With more comprehensive and diverse art performances, including dance, music, dramas, poems, lectures, videos, parent-child activities, and related activities, NHRM tried to engage human rights, art, and life with the general public. Presenting the core values of contemporary human rights to the audience, encouraging diverse participation in human rights issues, NHRM hoped to promote cross-generation, cross-field exchange, and communication.   The curator stated that the title of 2020 Human Rights Festival:  From Frost to Qingming was to commemorate the moment of Frost 70 years ago, November 29th, 1950. It was the end of the autumn, which was the first batch of National Taiwan University and Normal University students were executed.   The performance venue of From Frost to Qingming was not only in the Jingmei White Terror Memorial Park but also in the Shuiyuan Campus of National Taiwan University, one of the historic sights, where history happened is overlaid in the life of today.2020 Human Rights Festival

2021-01-15

An Exhibition on International Concern for Taiwanese Political Prisoners (1960-1992)Date: 12/10th/2020 - 05/02nd/2021Venue: Jing-Mei White Terror Memorial Park (No.131, Fusing Rd. Xindian Dist., New Taipei City 23150, Taiwan)In 1947, the 228 Massacre took place, with many Taiwanese killed or sentenced without any trial. According to the Executive Yuan’s research report on the 228 Massacre, between 10,000 and 20,000 people were killed by state violence. During the White Terror that began from 1949, political dissidents were arrested, leading tens of thousands more to become political prisoners, with more than one thousand people executed. Taiwan was forced to keep silent during the martial law period, with few willing to express support for political prisoners or their families. This continued up until the 1960s, with the formation of overseas Taiwanese political organizations such as the Taiwan Youth Society and its publication, “Taiwan Youth,” and when political support work began. Because the Cold War was in its early stages, the American government and the western world it led backed dictatorial regimes in the name of anti- Communism. It was under these circumstances that visitors from the international world came to Taiwan and saw with their own eyes the dictatorial regime that talk of “free China” covered over. Because of the oppression of democratic freedoms, it was hard to shed light on these political issues. As a result, holding onto their belief in human rights or religion, combined with the anti-war ideology set off by the Vietnam War, various human rights workers began to one after another take on the work of freeing political prisoners in Taiwan. Overseas Taiwanese groups built bridges with international human rights organizations, forming transnational networks from fragmentary origins, in order to provide a lifeline to desperate political prisoners. This exhibition will proceed by chronological order, introducing the political prisoner cases in Taiwan during the white terror period of time, and those groups or individuals that participated in activities to aid them, and the influence they were able to exert. In pursuing democracy and human rights, their blood and tears were able to realize the democratic freedoms that Taiwan currently enjoys, even if it was not easy. Although Taiwan no longer has political prisoners today, there are still a few Taiwanese are imprisoned abroad on senseless grounds, and must call on international society for help. In observing the democratic crisis currently faced today, examining the history of “Free Taiwan” can allow for this flame to be passed on, including those that searched for democracy in other places.National Human Rights Museum

Current Events
2021-11-24

The Historical Scenarios of the White Terror in Taiwan: The Exhibition on Jing-Mei White Terror Memorial Park   Jul. 26th, 2021- Dec. 31st, 2021 Venue: National Human Rights Museum- Jing-Mei White Terror Memorial Park (131, Fuxing Rd., Xindian, New Taipei City, Taiwan)     The National Human Rights Museum is the first human rights museum in Asia to be located at the site of injustice. Since its establishment in 2018, it has taken "human rights" as its core value to restore and represent the space. Building it into a room for continuous dialogue and reflection is also an essential task of the National Human Rights Museum to promote transformational justice.   The thematic exhibition of Jing-Mei White Terror Memorial Park is knowledgeable and promotes the public's understanding of the authoritarian regime and allows mutually conflicting opinions obtained in the exhibition hall, providing an opportunity for communication.   The exhibition provides visitors with a structured and contextual introduction of the complex history of the White Terror era that is based on the viewpoint of human rights. It also tries to guide the audience to reflect on the connection with contemporary times after understanding the human rights violations of authoritarian rule.

2021-08-16

Jul. 29th 2021-Aug. 13th 2022 Shared Journeys History is often presented as a single narrative that unfolds on a linear path, from one event to another. These ‘grand narratives’ of history are often shaped by entrenched ideologies, victors’ perspectives, colonial legacies, patriarchal values, and contested identities.   The Shared Journeys exhibition aims to decolonize the mind and the exclusive history, by bringing to light hidden, marginalized, or lost histories, and the stories of people that have lived them. The Shared Journeys exhibition includes the work of 12 member organizations of the Asian and Pacific Sites of Conscience Network, representing seven countries.   Afghanistan The Afghanistan Human Rights and Democracy Organization, AHRDO, initiated the “Memory Boxes” project in 2011 that is to collect records of thousands of items, such as the victim’s belongings, narratives, and stories from different conflicting periods at various locations, in order to challenges the deep-seated culture of impunity, public amnesia and a policy of forgetting the past.   Participating Organizations: The Afghanistan Human Rights and Democracy Organization     Tibet In the seven decades since 1951, the rise in the number of Tibetans protesting and committing self-immolation, the religious repression and cultural genocide continues within Tibet; monitoring and surveillance of citizens’ activities is at unprecedented levels; language rights are denied; and enforced disappearances and arrests are commonplace. The Exhibits highlight hidden histories that contest the CCP’s narratives.   Participating Organizations: Tibet Museum     Taiwan In 1989, Taiwan introduced the first group of migrant workers from Southeast Asia and it has steadily grown since the passing of the Employment Services Act in 1992. Today the migrant worker population in Taiwan exceeds 710,000. Despite being an important driver of the economy, they are either invisible to the general public or simply treated as work-horses who when they are no longer fit to work, run away rather than being repatriated to resort to a life of crime or become victims of violence. Through the oral histories of four migrant workers and their life stories, this exhibit contests that popular narrative.   Participating Organizations: National Human Rights Museum     Cambodia The exhibits from Cambodia focus on survivors’ narratives from the period of history dominated by the Khmer Rouge, especially the treatment of ethnic and religious minorities, and the continuing need for memorializing the victims of violence through inter-generational dialogue   Participating Organizations: The Peace Institute of Cambodia Youth for Peace Cambodia Kdei-Karuna     Bangladesh During the Liberation war of 1971, the Pakistani Army, together with their local collaborators used sexual violence and rape as a weapon of war. The objective was cultural genocide, a change in ethno-linguistic identity through Pakistani children born to Bengali women. This exhibition showcases the stories of survivors of sexual and gender based violence that speak their truths to demystify the humiliation and public shame placed on the victim.   Participating Organizations: Liberation War Museum     Sri Lanka After 26 years of conflicts, “The Herstories Project” of Sri Lanka archived with 285 women’s stories collected between 2012 and 2013. It is a deliberate effort to narratives of war and to give voice to women in conflict. “The International Centre for Ethnic Studies” uses comics as a means of creating a space for irrevocably divided communities. This oral history project by the Institute for “Social Development” captures stories of re-migration and internal displacement of estate-sector Tamil communities. This exhibit traces the history of migration through three stories of (re)migration.   Participating Organizations: The Herstories Project The International Centre for Ethnic Studies The Institute for Social Development     Nepal The human toll of the ‘People’s War’ (1996-2006) in Nepal was profound; over 17,000 people were killed, 1,500 disappeared and an estimated 20,000 tortured. Almost eight years passed before any transitional justice mechanism was formalized when the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and Commission of Inquiry into Enforced Disappearances were legally mandated by Parliament. Both the commissions failed to address the need of the victims’ families. Both, the Network of Families of the Disappeared and Voices of Women Nepal work on transitional justice issues and believe in advocating for a victim-centered approach. Their work contests historical memories of the conflict through story-telling.    Participating Organizations: Network of Families of the Disappeared, Nepal Voices of Women Media   This exhibition serves to remind us that history is also perspective. These stories are not unique, and their impact is not just localized to a specific country. They are histories of our world.